World Painting Tour – Chapter 8: A Dream Come True – Pithora Art

In the cultural capital of the Gujarat, India Robert Markey and I were invited by the Municipality and Sachin Kaluskar to participate in a project that has never been done before. Here in #Vadodara we have spent the last week painting together with five incredible Pithora artists, who have carried on their spiritual indigenous painting style for centuries. Pithora art is said to be a “dying art” because this beautiful art form has not been promoted,

World Painting Tour: Chapter 7 – Emerging from the slums, Paint an elephant!

Every child in our class is a “Slumdog Millionair”. They were not waiting around to win the lottery to get out of the slums, they earned their smiles by making a choice in life! They choose to find happiness regardless of the outside circumstances that are out of their control. They are millionaires of love! You can feel it in their joy and see it in their art! This last week the youth drew their designs, made their mosaics and painted their backgrounds without anyone telling them they cannot do something.

The World Painting Tour: Chapter 6 – From the Slums to Alchemy through Mosaics in Surat, India

At the Surat airport in Western India Robert Markey and I were welcomed by Sagar and his incredible team from the NGO Pathshala NGO; a group of young adults who are “fighting against a ticking clock” to bring as much beauty into the world and into the hearts of the underrepresented youth as possible, before the pressures from society and family push them into marriage and the traditional lifestyle. These courageous volunteers of Pathshala work every day to plant the seeds of change,

World Painting Tour Chapter 5: The Love for Painting in the Falling Snow of Athens

We stepped foot into the abandoned hospital in Athens, Greece, and found Syrian refugee youth running around with photocopies of their hands and faces in distorted positions. They were having so much fun with the Spanish volunteers and the Xerox machine. Around Greece, hotels and vacant buildings have been converted into temporary refugee housing. During the introductory meeting with the director we learned that almost all of the hundred and sixty Syrians residing in this old hospital were mothers and children,